Construction Site Excavation Safety Steps

Excavation and trenching are naturally hazardous construction operations, and contractors need to take all the appropriate steps to ensure worker safety. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) defines an excavation as “any man-made cut, cavity, trench, or depression in the earth’s surface formed by earth removal.” A trench, in particular, is defined as “a narrow underground excavation that is deeper than it is wide, and is no wider than 15 feet (4.5 meters).”

When we approach any excavation, drilling or demolition job we keep safety first, starting with the planning for the job. It is not just the possibility of the sides of an excavated plot or trench collapsing. Safety planning also must accommodate the interaction of our people and the machines they need to employ to carry out the job, and the terrain on which those machines must operate. Continue reading “Construction Site Excavation Safety Steps”

Helical Anchor Installation Relies Upon Accurate Torque Measurements

Helical anchors enjoy widespread use today to help stabilize and secure above-ground structures, especially when that structure is built on ground that may be or has become unstable. The anchors themselves are steel shafts with helical coils or plates welded on at an angle. The shafts are screwed into the soil beneath the foundation to a depth that enables the coil to support the load. When foundation drilling calls for helical anchors, the depth of the anchor is drilled into the ground is determined by precisely measuring the torque it takes to turn the anchor. Generally, the higher the torque value the more stable the soil. This gives soil and structural engineers an accurate indication of the load-bearing capacity of the helical anchors. Continue reading “Helical Anchor Installation Relies Upon Accurate Torque Measurements”